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Article category: Feature Article

Dr. M. Lee Allison, Arizona State Geologist and Chair of the Arizona Geological Survey, died on August 16 from a critical head injury incurred over the weekend. Lee was a true visionary, dedicated to expanding public access to the geosciences and forging cooperation among diverse groups.

Article category: Feature Article

Down-to-Earth Series (DTE) — addresses geologic concepts in a "down-to-earth" manner with a minimum of jargon.

Article category: Feature Article

Overview. On 30 June 2016, the Arizona Geological Survey transfers out of State Government to the College of Sciences at the University Arizona.

Article category: Feature Article

"Harvard is the granddaddy" of mineral collections, said Professor Bob Downs, Curator of the University of Arizona Mineral Museum, as he welcomed an overflow crowd of several hundred people to the unveiling of the American Mineral Heritage: The Harvard Collection at the University of Arizona’s Mineral Museum on February 5th.

Article category: Feature Article

To most geologists, geologic maps are the single most useful type of information for understanding the geology of the land surface.

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The Arizona landscape is no stranger to landslides. The entire spectrum of landslide types – debris avalanche, debris flow, earthflow, creep, rock fall, rock slide, topple, rotational and translational landslides - are encountered here. 

Article category: Feature Article

In this article, we present some of the highlights of the geological exploration of Arizona, focused on the role of early surveys by the U.S. Government and later geologic studies by the USGS and the AZGS and its predecessors.

Article category: Feature Article

On this, the 125th Anniversary of the Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS), we are celebrating the work of hundreds of geoscientists who struggled to understand and reconstruct Arizona’s geologic past.

Article category: Feature Article

Southeastern Arizona’s Basin and Range is composed of high relief, rugged mountain ranges – e.g., the Santa Catalinas, Rincons, Galiuros, Pinaleños, Santa Ritas, Chiracahuas – that are separated by intervening tributaries of the Gila River.

Article category: Feature Article

Arizona’s Grand Canyon reveals an enormous sequence of rocks that represent more than a third of the 4.5-billion-year age of the Earth. The canyon itself, however, is quite young in comparison, with most or all canyon incision occurring over the past 5 million years according to most interpretations.

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